Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Tabletop Images

 
 

We recently added a new section to our web gallery named, “Tabletop Images”. 
We’ve found that not everyone has the wall space to display our prints so we are offering a solution.

 
 

You’ll find a selection of metal and ceramic tiles offered in sizes that are perfect for a desk, table, or countertop. The metal images are printed the same as our much larger metal prints just smaller; yet with the same great detail. The ceramic tiles are all 8x6 and may be displayed on a table using a built in easel or on a wall using the attached hook.

 
 

Prices are affordable ranging from $29.95 to $115.00 with equally affordable shipping of $5.00 each.
The metal prints includes base made either of bamboo or acrylic and are included in the price.  Sizes are from 8x10, 8x12, and 10x10.

 
 

The ceramic tiles are limited to quantities we have in stock. The metal prints are unlimited however we will need at least 7-days to produce and ship them to you.
 
 
 

Visit the “Tabletop Images” section of our web gallery for more information. Our work can also be found at Absolutely Art Gallery & Gifts, 16701 N. Oracle Road, Suite 145, Catalina, Arizona 85739 (520) 818-1242 and on Face Book at here or our Face Book page here.

 


 

Sandy & Don
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Monday, October 1, 2018

Fujifilm GF250

f/5.6 1/80 ISO 800
Processed entirely in C1-11

I can’t say enough good things about this lens.  The GF250 equates to 197mm (35mm equivalent) when mounted on a GFX50s, Be prepared for a large lens that weights in close to 3 pounds (1.42 kg) and measures 8” (203.5mm) in length; the sunshade is quite large as well. There’s a rotating removable tripod collar and the lens has anti shake and is also weather-sealed. There’s so much more to the lens that I suggest you go to Fuji and look at the specs yourself.
f/5.6 1/100 ISO 800
Handheld
 
It gets better with the GF1.4 TC WR Teleconverter.  Using the 1.4 with the 250 brings it to 350mm or approximately 280mm in 35mm terms.
 
f/9 1/100 ISO 400
Handheld
f/8 1/400 ISO 320
Handheld
 
I’ve been using the 250 and 1.4 since the end of July capturing hummingbirds and then to San Diego Wildlife Park recently without any issues. I’ve shot both on and off tripod and despite its weight I’ve found it very easy to shoot handheld as it is well balanced both with and without the 1.4. Autofocusing is what I’ve come to expect from my other Fujifilm GF lens. Quick and easy.
 
f/8 1/125 ISO 400
Handheld
 
I spent over 5-hours walking around the San Diego Wildlife Park with the GFX50s, GF250 and 1.4 around my neck shooting over 900 images with the majority of them on continuous mode. Up until the release of the GFX I felt that I would never shoot this much this way with anything other than a 35mm camera.
 
f/5.6 1/200 ISO 400
Handheld
 
The autofocus is spot on. The amount of detail offered by the GFX50s allows me the chance to zoom and crop into the files to achieve the image I want. My one wish is for a slightly longer focal length say around 300mm without the 1.4. A 300mm would give me close to 240mm before adding the 1.4 and 420 (336 35mm equivalent)with it.  The good news is that should I decide I really need a longer focal length I can easily use another companies lens.
 
f/5.6 1/250 ISO 400
Handheld
 
f/8 1/320 ISO 250
Handheld
 
I’m keeping this short as I have a lot to do within the short period.  There’s also great news in that Capture One now fully supports the GFX 50S and appears that they will do so with the GFX50R and GFX100 coming next year. I’ve been using C1-11 for several days now processing images that were captured in San Diego.  All the images shared here were processed using a combination of C1-11 and Photoshop.

Stay tuned for more.

Don
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Splash Art Photography with a Fujifilm GFX 50s Part 3

Neon Uproar
f/11 ISO 400 1-second
 
Train wreck
f/11 ISO 400 1-second
 
Splash Dance
f/22 ISO 400 1-second
Back again with more information.
ELF Disruption
f/22 ISO 400 1-second
 

I recently upped the anti by adding 2-addition siphons for a total of 3-separate drops valves. Doing this we also changed the brains of the system from Cognisys Stopshot Water Drop kit to the much more involved Stopshot Studio 3 valve water drop kit.

Several thoughts on the Studio 3 system are; I can now control the entire enterprise directly from my laptop. The software included runs on both a Mac or PC and I'm using it on a 15” Microsoft Surface Book II from one of my USB 3 ports. Another thought is that I have better control over the individual drop valves setting them for up to 3-drops at a time and various intervals. The same is true with the flashes and I now routinely use between 2 and 3 flashes per session.  There’s much more to this however the greatest aspect is that I can drop up to 3-colors now.
Fracas
f/22 ISO 400 1-second
 
When I first began dropping 3-colors I decided to go for the standard RGB as in Red, Green and Blue. I’ve tried Purple, Yellow, Purple as well as various other colors. I’ve also experimented leaving the well clear of color; at least until I begin dropping into it which after awhile can make for an interesting color. I’ve also added colors to the well to experiment with the results. UPDATE: I now fill the well with clear cold water letting the colors add as the drops fall. I change the water depending on how long I shoot. 
I’ve tested various combinations of drops, 1 each, 2,1,1, 2-each, 1,2,1 etc. You are limited only by your imagination.
Amok
f/18 ISO 400 1-second
 
The last blog I shared I had ended up trying and liking a black paint roller tray. That still works well however I since found a new tray to act as the well.  It’s plastic, black and measures 12x32 and  about 1.5’ deep on the shallow end. The width and depth are good however the length is what makes this tray perfect. Made by Husky, it's a x-large stackable garage storage bin I happened to find at my local The Home Depot. I've been using this for several weeks now with great success.
Shambles
f/18 ISO 400 1-second
 
I’ve now just about perfected my solutions making me feel more mad scientist each time I make a batch. I normally make a batch of gum the night before making enough to fill the well to the level I want with a little left over for the siphons. I’ve got a couple older glass beakers I used to use in making up a varnish for my canvas prints. 50mg gum, 50 mg 2%milk, 100mg water and a generous helping of food coloring. Stir well before filling the siphons.  I’ve not been adding any colors to the well knowing that in time the drops from the siphons will color it.  I also found I like the well to be a darker color mixture so the eye stays with the drop sculpture.
UPDATE: I've done more research and I now shoot I'll be using a pure gum solution with 2% milk and food coloring. This solution gives a more plastic look to the drops.  I also stopped adding any gum solution to the well, instead I'm using plain cold tap water.  I also very recently began using cold water that has been refrigerated overnight in the well at a depth of approximately 1.5 inches.
Twisted Imp
f/18 ISO 400 1-second
 
Please note that I began writing this a several weeks ago updating  information along the way.

I haven’t talked about how I’ve been setting the camera up until now. I had been doing this in a small confined area that only had room for the small (24x42) folding table and rolling computer stand. I was forced to set the camera on the table due to limited area and kept going back and forth using either a table top tripod or a large Platypod. Both worked and both had their strengths and weaknesses. The new table I’m now using is 30x60 and set up in the garage which allows me the freedom of using a choice of either a tripod or table pod.
Ka-Boom
f/16 ISO 400 2-seconds
 
Manifesto
f/10 ISO 400 1-second
 
Macro photography is about getting as close to the subject as possible. The GF120 while a macro lens is still a 50% lens. Using the new 45mm extension tube allows me to photograph at 100% at a much closer distance. I’ve now used the 120 with and without the extension tube. The extension tube allows me to get in closer however I find that I might be too close as I was getting the occasional water drops on the lens. Removing the extension tube allows me to set back a couple inches further keeping the lens dry. I also use the lens hood in order to better protect the lens from splashes.  I found that in each case I was very pleased to have a full frame image that I could print. Here again you’ll need to experiment with your own setup.
Distracted
f/10 ISO 400 1-second
 
While not water drop related it nevertheless is macro related. I’ve also begun experimenting using the 45mm extension tube on the Fuji GF250 lens. I’ve attached the 1.4 extension to the 250 as well as the macro tube. I’ve found I can get macro images at a focal distance of 5 to 6 feet. I’ll share a couple samples here and maybe write more about this process later.
 
GF250, 1.4 extender 45mm macro extension tube
f/5.6 1/200 ISO 160
Handheld - cropped to taste
 
GF250, 1.4 extender 45mm macro extension tube
f/8 1/160 ISO 160
Handheld - cropped to taste
 
GF250, 1.4 extender 45mm macro extension tube
f/11 1/200 ISO 200
Handheld - cropped to taste
 

That's it for now, thanks for visiting, feel free to leave a comment or question and I'll do my best to answer all.
 
 
 
Don