Wednesday, August 20, 2014

"Retired in ..." series


We've been collecting old beat-up vehicles on our trips throughout the southwest and have decided to offer them as a series.  Each image is 28x16 and offered either as a finished canvas print (stretched ready to hang) or on glossy paper.  Canvas prints $145 each, or 2 or more at $125 each.  Glossy paper prints are $65 each, or 2 or more for $50 each.  The prices quoted do not include Arizona taxes or shipping and handling.

Currently we have 7-vehicles to offer.  We are keeping these true to the state they were found.  "Retired in Arizona" was found off I-40 just as you enter Arizona; "Retired in Colorado" was found in Delta; "Retired in Idaho" was found in Victor; "Retired in New Mexico" was found just east of Albuquerque off I-40; "Retired in Texas" was found off I-20 near Big Springs; "Retired in Utah" was found in Moab; and "Retired in Wyoming" was found very near Jackson.
 
"Retired in Arizona"

"Retired in Colorado"

"Retired in Idaho"

"Retired in New Mexico"

"Retired in Texas"

"Retired in Utah"

"Retired in Wyoming"
 
We'll be placing these in our web gallery shortly; however, in the meantime please feel free to contact us for further information or for purchase.  We haven't stopped looking so more will be added to the series as we find them.
 
Sandy & Don

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Having fun with wildlife

Sony A7r
FE70-200 (133mm) f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ 160
240mm f/8 1/400 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ 160
240mm f/9 1/160 ISO 50
 
We took a day off from shooting landscape and capturing lightning and visited Out of Africa located near Sedona AZ.  Sandy used her new Sony A7r with the new FE 70-200 while Don used his Phase One DF/IQ160 medium format camera and a Schneider 240 LS lens.  While both of us had our Really Right Stuff Monopods Sandy ended up shooting almost exclusively handheld while Don averaged about 50% handheld and monopod.  Don also used the new RRS long lens support for the 240 LS and found it easy to shoot handheld while adding a great deal of balance to the monopod.

24-hours old and weighs 70 pounds
Sony A7r FE 70-200 (200mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ160
240mm f/8 1/400 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ160
240mm f/8 1/400 ISO 50

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (95mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50
 
All images were opened in Capture One Pro where they were evaluated for clarity and sharpness before being saved in a Photoshop fie for processing.  Once in Photoshop CC the files were all treated to "Shake Reduction" found under the filter section (some needed the attention while others didn't). 

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (123mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (70mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ160
240mm f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ160
240mm f/8 1/250 ISO 50
 
We were fortunate to see and capture a small herd of Zebras, Giraffe, as well as a Rhino, a White Tiger, Masai Cattle and other critters.

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (200mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (200mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (200mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (200mm)
f/6.3 1/250 ISO 50

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (139mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50
 
A quick note on using medium format to capture wildlife.  We've stated previously that wildlife do not pose.  The Phase One DF sometimes gets a bad rap for being notoriously difficult to autofocus in a quick environment.  Don will admit that it did "hunt" at times however the subject was also coming quickly towards him; in the end it all worked out.
 
Sony A7r FE 70-200 (97mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ 160
240mm f/8 1/200 ISO 50

Phase One DF/IQ 160
240mm f/7.1 1/200 ISO 50

Sony A7r FE 70-200 (200mm)
f/8 1/250 ISO 50
 
The images shared here are a combination of cropped and actual full frame; and we aren't going to share which this time as we'd like to see if you can figure it out; of course it helps shooting with 36-megapixel 35mm full frame and 60-megapixel full frame medium format cameras.

Photobomb

 
Sandy & Don

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Capturing lightning with a Sony A7r


First off, this is extremely dangerous. I've written about how dangerous shooting in slot canyons can  be.  Capturing lightning is even more dangerous.  With slot canyon photography you can plan ahead by checking the weather out to around a 50- mile radius and if there's even a hint of rain or thunderstorms you need to rethink your plan.   Not so with lightning.  You are actively looking for a storm with thunder and lightning.  In most instances you'll be outside or under some sort of cover shooting on a tripod which contains metal, a camera which also contains metal; both of which can be a great attraction to lightning.  If you're lucky and lightning does hit, the most that will happen is you fry your camera.  The other extreme is that you fry yourself.  Have I mentioned how dangerous this is?

I feel better posting the above before going into the blog.  This will more of a teaser than our normal blog as we only have 2-images to share. 
 

- First lightning captured using the Sony A7r, 665nm infrared, 14mm Rokinon lens, f/8, 1/125 ISO 100.  Captured at 4:17 PM.
 
 

Using a Sony A7r which I had converted to capture 665nm infrared, I attached a Lightning Trigger.  This "trigger" senses the lightning and captures it.  That's the explanation - I strongly suggest a visit to the website for more in-depth information.
 

- Second day of testing the Lightning Trigger.  Same camera and lens, I believe this was shot at f/22, 1/15 ISO 50 at 3:12 PM.
 
 
Both images were processed using a combination of Capture One Pro and Photoshop CC with the help of NIK HRD Efex Pro.   
 
We'll be writing/sharing more in the future so once again please consider this a teaser.
 
Don